News
Nov 4, 2016

Saltmarsh Seminar at SNH Battleby


Find out about recent work and new approaches to understanding saltmarsh processes in the context of climate change: Scotland and beyond

 

The Saltmarsh Seminar has been organised by Prof Stewart Angus (SNH) and supported by MASTS Coastal Processes and Dynamics Forum chaired by Dr Jim Hansom (University of Glasgow).

 

The event will showcase recent research and new findings on saltmarsh dynamics. The programme will allow generous time for questioning, discussion and sharing understanding. The seminar will be relevant to academics, practitioners and policy makers.


Confirmed speakers

Introduction - Dr Jim Hansom, University of Glasgow

 

The Scottish Saltmarsh Survey - Tom Haynes, Director of Ecology, Naturebureau. See http://www.snh.gov.uk/publications-data-and-research/publications/search-the-catalogue/publication-detail/?id=2404 (SNH Commissioned Research)

 

Morrich More coastal change analysis - Dr Tom Dargie, Boreas Ecology(SNH Commissioned Research)

 

The importance of biophysical interactions in salt marsh ecosystem functioning: past, current and future coastal research at the University of Glasgow - Dr Thorsten Balke, University of Glasgow.

 

Changes in High Water Mark in Scottish saltmarsh systems - Dr Alistair Rennie, Scottish Natural Heritage & Scottish Government.

 

Saltmarsh change – an English perspective - Graham Weaver, Natural England

 

A new model for saltmarsh change and Relative Sea Level Rise in Scotland - Professor Stewart Angus, Scottish Natural Heritage. 

 

Sea level rise, sediments and marshes: some insights from natural and restored marshes in the Schelde estuary - Professor Patrick Meire, Head of Ecosystem Management Research Group, University of Antwerp. 

 

Seminar organiser: Professor Stewart Angus stewart.angus@snh.gov.uk 01463 725234
To register attendance, please contact Margo Moncur, Battleby margo.moncur@snh.gov.uk (01738 458648), from whom directions to Battleby may also be obtained.

Solway Firth Partnership